The dance floor tracks you hear on "Spank Da Bass" are going to contain that sub sonic element, but it's the other kooky left field things that will amaze and stun you...

In this edition of "Spank Da Bass" were roll back the clock ..
After doing radio for 8 years I'The dance floor tracks you hear on "Spank Da Bass" are going to contain that sub sonic element, but it's the other kooky left field things that will amaze and stun you...ve been sent a lot of Dj mixes over that time.
Some of them are corkers.. And maybe only heard 1 once..

so I?ve pulled out a couple of classics!

1st up a 1 hour mix by Pressure drop!
the a 30 min mash up terminalhead

Sadly both groups are not putting out music now?
But there mixed CD are worth it..

Its all hot..!! So get up and shake it and Spank Da Bass!



Pressure Drop mix - No track list
Terminalhead mix - No track list






Pressure Drop
2 London-based disc jockeys Justin Langlands and Dave Henley first met in 1986, at the peak of the house scene.
Under the moniker Blood Brothers they became stalwarts of the genre. Pressure Drop was born with the singles
Feeling Good (Big World, 1990), Back To Back (Big World, 1990), Trancefusion (Big World, 1990).
The style changed with the album Upset (Boombastic, 1992), one of the precursors of trip-hop, the praxis
(guest singers, guest rappers, guest horn sections) if not the sound (You're Mine).


They got screwed by sony with Tread- 2001 it got caned as it was released..
if you can find this buy it.. its there best work...

See the amazing catalogue
http://www.discogs.com/artist/Pressure+Drop



Terminalhead's
You can complicate dance music, if you must. Dress it up in sonic frills and audio gimmickry and desperate new genres.
Alternatively, like Terminalhead, you can acknowledge that it?s only really the beats, the rhymes and the flavour that matter
and take a stance accordingly.

Formed in 1996, Terminalhead briefly took the shape of a seven piece, touring a live breakbeat sound which won them
plaudits from the crowd and alarm among the supposedly more accomplished bands they supported. But life on the tour bus
was crowded and, musically, there was a fiercer groove to explore. So Terminalhead scaled down to a three piece -
Pete Marett (the beats), Mr Spee (the rhymes) and Lee Groves (the flavour; ie, production wizardry) - and the band as we know it on the both party and politically-minded "Weekend Warriors" was on the rampage.

The two of them formed the PuSH label and gained a rep' on the nascent breakbeat scene. They sketched out the basics
of the Terminalhead sound, got some impressive/amusing remix commissions - Geri Halliwell, the Lightening Seeds, NSYNC - then figured it was time to amp it up a few notches. Enter Spee, a very big geezer on a mission and with quite some history.

sadlly there are no more as a band...
Spee is now front man for Dreadzone
lee is now programming for the likes of Goldfrapp ..

Just because there gone don't mean you cant get a earful of mad beats..

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As far as I know, I am not a robot.